The order by a King County, Washington, judge that The Seattle Times and other media must turn over unpublished content to the police is a blow to independent journalism.

The order imperils journalists documenting this summer’s historic protests and sends the wrong message about the media as a check on government power.

King County Superior Court Judge Nelson Lee’s recent order that The Seattle Times and four other news outlets must hand unpublished protest video and photos to police investigators is a troubling interpretation of the state’s shield law.

Police want the journalists’ images to help identify suspects who set fire to police cars and stole police firearms during a May 30 protest in downtown Seattle. Certainly, those involved in the crimes should be held accountable.

But even the mistaken conflation of journalists with police investigators can directly impact news gatherers’ ability to do their work.

Independence from political and commercial influence is the backbone of responsible journalism. Journalists must report in the public interest, not in the service of government.

— The Seattle Times

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(1) comment

CVA-42

I believe the police have every right to ALL of the video evidence to prosecute unlawful acts. Media outlets only want to show what is important to their agenda.

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